Happy Release Day Psychic Markers

Having only released their self-titled album back in May this year, London band Psychic Markers today share a whole new collection of songs on their mixtape Blue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque. Previously only available as a bonus cassette, the mixtape is available digitally to stream and buy.

The album, split into two parts, was recorded during lockdown between London and Paris, where band members Leon Dufficy and Steven Dove were holed up respectively. Initially recorded as a bonus cassette for the self-titled album Psychic MarkersBlue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque is a collection of new ideas manifesting, as Steven Dove mentions… 

“I spent a lot of lockdown waiting impatiently for books and other goodies to be delivered, one of which was Richard Bruatigan’s ‘In Watermelon Sugar’ who you can hear reading the poem “All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace” on the final track. The rest of my time was spent watching movies, eating and making this record, ’Sucre de la Pasteque’, or in English ‘Watermelon Sugar’. In contrast with most musical projects there was no grand plan here, I wanted to make something inspired by how I was feeling on a day to day basis. I knew I had a limited supply of equipment and only a pair of headphones so I relied heavily on my imagination, which thankfully had plenty of time to drift off on various tangents.” 

“There was also an emphasis on having my location influence the songs (I was in Paris), most obviously on the duet ‘Speechless Implications’ in which the lyrics are sung in both English and French, a bi-lingual pop song of sorts. Above all it gave me the freedom to write and record in a manner reminiscent of the days starting out making music, hopefully it comes across this way.”

Leon Dufficy also gives his take on the creation of this new collection of songs… “One morning I was in an internet rabbit hole looking for vibes/visuals to accompany the band and I stumbled across some footage of a 60’s housewife taking LSD for the first time. The way she describes what it was doing to her mind/body, a sort of hope wrapped up in sadness or nostalgia for a forgotten memory or an unknown future. It directly resonated with me, I tried to keep that feeling present through my side of the tape.  

These are weird times and it makes you think about the real things like friends and family, these feelings crept their way into my songs. The last track has my 3-year-old son Orbison singing a song he wrote, in other parts you can hear nature recordings that were made in my mums’ backyard in Australia. It was my way of keeping them close to me while we waited out the days.”

Blue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque is available to order HERE.

Psychic Markers share ‘Blue Dreams’

Psychic Markers share another hypnotic track from their upcoming mixtape Blue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque. Today’s shared track, titled ‘Blue Dreams’, uses a sample of a 60’s housewife reflecting on taking LSD for the first time, set against a dreamy soundscape. 

Of the track Dufficy states…”One morning I was in an internet rabbit hole and I stumbled across some footage of a 60’s housewife taking LSD for the first time. The way she describes what it was doing to her mind/body, a sort of hope wrapped up in sadness or nostalgia for a forgotten memory or an unknown future… It directly resonated with me.

These are weird times and it makes you think about the real things like friends and family, these feelings crept their way into my songs. The last track has my 3-year-old son Orbison singing a song he wrote, in other parts you can hear nature recordings that were made in my mums’ backyard in Australia. It was my way of keeping them close to me while we waited out the days.” 

The album, split into two parts, was recorded during lockdown between London and Paris, where band members Leon Dufficy and Steven Dove were holed up respectively. Initially recorded as a bonus cassette for the self-titled album Psychic Markers, Blue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque is a collection of new ideas manifesting and will be available digitally on Friday 24th July.

Psychic Markers share ‘Speechless Implications (D’un Soupir)’

Having only just released their self-titled album back in May, Psychic Markers are set to release a new mixtape on 24th July titled Blue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque that will only be available digitally and on cassette. Today the London band share the bi-lingual ‘Speechless Implications (D’un Soupir)’, their new track reminiscent of a Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin number. 

The album, split into two parts, was recorded during lockdown between London and Paris, where band members Leon Dufficy and Steven Dove were holed up respectively. Initially recorded as a bonus cassette for the self-titled album Psychic MarkersBlue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque is a collection of new ideas manifesting, as Steven Dove mentions… 

“I spent a lot of lockdown waiting impatiently for books and other goodies to be delivered, one of which was Richard Bruatigan’s ‘In Watermelon Sugar’ who you can hear reading the poem “All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace” on the final track. The rest of my time was spent watching movies, eating and making this record, ’Sucre de la Pasteque’, or in English ‘Watermelon Sugar’. In contrast with most musical projects there was no grand plan here, I wanted to make something inspired by how I was feeling on a day to day basis. I knew I had a limited supply of equipment and only a pair of headphones so I relied heavily on my imagination, which thankfully had plenty of time to drift off on various tangents.” 

“There was also an emphasis on having my location influence the songs (I was in Paris), most obviously on the duet ‘Speechless Implications’ in which the lyrics are sung in both English and French, a bi-lingual pop song of sorts. Above all it gave me the freedom to write and record in a manner reminiscent of the days starting out making music, hopefully it comes across this way.”

Leon Dufficy also gives his take on the creation of this new collection of songs… “One morning I was in an internet rabbit hole looking for vibes/visuals to accompany the band and I stumbled across some footage of a 60’s housewife taking LSD for the first time. The way she describes what it was doing to her mind/body, a sort of hope wrapped up in sadness or nostalgia for a forgotten memory or an unknown future. It directly resonated with me, I tried to keep that feeling present through my side of the tape.  
These are weird times and it makes you think about the real things like friends and family, these feelings crept their way into my songs. The last track has my 3-year-old son Orbison singing a song he wrote, in other parts you can hear nature recordings that were made in my mums’ backyard in Australia. It was my way of keeping them close to me while we waited out the days.”

“melodies flow, drama is intensified, and darker atmospherics are embraced” MOJO

“alluringly hazy and beguiling… the obvious promise of their earlier work has blossomed into something more expansive” Electronic Sound

“impressively immersive” Record Collector

Blue Dreams, or Sucre De La Pastéque is available to order HERE.

Psychic Markers unveil ‘Sacred Geometry’ visuals

Psychic Markers’ today share the video for ‘Sacred Geometry’, taken from their latest self-titled LP, which is out now via Bella Union. The animated clip was directed by Lucy Dyson — known for her work with Beyoncé, Courtney Barnett, and Adult Swim— and is available to watch below…

“I had fun exploring the idea that while we are all operating from a cellular level of creation controlled by biological forces, we can’t really intercept (from the primordial drain sludge from whence we come, to the higher vibrations of the flower of life/cell division/nature/unity) our desire to live with the inconceivable idea that we are riding the escalator of life to our deaths,” director Lucy Dyson explains. “The grass in the animation is both nature/life and death/burial, it keeps rising up like a hyper-green memorial lawn. And so, our only choice in life is over our conscious actions, hence the push and pull of giving in to the evil red eye, the yellow eye is neutral. If you do give in however, you just end up back in the drain, a lowly slime-form having to work through everything all over again.”

A near death experience being sucked into an active sandstorm during a US road trip is enough to make you think about life. Being immersed in a swirling vortex of sand, dust, tumbleweed and detritus whilst trying to keep control of a speeding car might have only been a brief flash moment in Steven Dove’s life but it was enough for the Psychic Markers man to question life. “These things impact you,” he says. “I got thinking about human nature, our proneness to mistakes, imperfection and the implications of reactionary decision making.”

The results of such lyrical reflection, and broad spectrum of thought, can be heard throughout the latest Psychic Markers album, one that Dove describes as, “Imagine a David Cronenberg-style movie in which each morning you awake to find your brain merged inside someone else’s head – you see life from a totally different angle.”

Approaching things from a different angle was also the objective sonically. “We wanted to make an album that was 100% us,” says Leon Dufficy, who heads up the band with Dove. “With zero dilution from other influences.” This natural, intuition-led, direction is something immediately apparent on the album, one that weaves seamlessly between pulsing groove-locked electronica and psychedelic pop as frequently as it glides from sparkling melody to rich cinematic ambience.

“Cohesive yet diverse,” is what the band have said of their music and it fits their personalities too, with members coming from as far afield as Australia and Yorkshire. Dufficy and Dove wrote and produced the record together, the sultry yet subtle bass comes from Luke Jarvis, who also did the band’s artwork, whilst the glowing backing vocals of Alannah Ashworth feature alongside the shared percussion duties of Lewis Baker and Jim Wallis.

Playing with structure and form, and the overlapping role between lyrics and music, is rooted in the album. “I was tired of writing within the constraints of a verse/chorus structure and wanted to be expressive in alternative ways,” says Dove. “It’s like walking the same route to get from a to b – eventually it becomes mundane and for this record I wanted to try walking a different way.”

Dufficy also found himself going down a rabbit hole of old gear for the album, exploring four tracks, micro cassettes and drum machines. “I wanted to see how it would impact our writing and recording process,” he says. “By taking away the endless options you have in the digital world.” The result is one that adds to the already deeply textural world of the band – an approach that has previously reared its head via doo-wop-esque harmony vocals, thoughtfully layered immersive guitars or enveloping atmospheres – as well as adding a further sense of diving into the unknown.

Much like being caught in the middle of a sandstorm, or a piece of equipment holding out until the final sputtering moments of musical completion, there’s something unique, engulfing and encompassing about the latest Psychic Markers album. A beautiful bottling of time and place that magically ends up somewhere completely new.

 Psychic Markers self-titled, third LP is out now via Bella Union.

The band will release a mixtape of 12 new tracks recorded during lockdown on 24 July, 2020.

Happy Release Day Psychic Markers

Today the London based psych outfit Psychic Markers release their dreamy new self titled album via Bella Union.

A near death experience being sucked into an active sandstorm during a US road trip is enough to make you think about life. Being immersed in a swirling vortex of sand, dust, tumbleweed and detritus whilst trying to keep control of a speeding car might have only been a brief flash moment in Steven Dove’s life but it was enough for the Psychic Markers man to question life. “These things impact you,” he says. “I got thinking about human nature, our proneness to mistakes, imperfection and the implications of reactionary decision making.”

The results of such lyrical reflection, and broad spectrum of thought, can be heard throughout the latest Psychic Markers album, one that Dove describes as, “Imagine a David Cronenberg-style movie in which each morning you awake to find your brain merged inside someone else’s head – you see life from a totally different angle.”

Approaching things from a different angle was also the objective sonically. “We wanted to make an album that was 100% us,” says Leon Dufficy, who heads up the band with Dove. “With zero dilution from other influences.” This natural, intuition-led, direction is something immediately apparent on the album, one that weaves seamlessly between pulsing groove-locked electronica and psychedelic pop as frequently as it glides from sparkling melody to rich cinematic ambience.

“Cohesive yet diverse,” is what the band have said of their music and it fits their personalities too, with members coming from as far afield as Australia and Yorkshire. Dufficy and Dove wrote and produced the record together, the sultry yet subtle bass comes from Luke Jarvis, who also did the band’s artwork, whilst the glowing backing vocals of Alannah Ashworth feature alongside the shared percussion duties of Lewis Baker and Jim Wallis.

The opening track ‘Where Is the Prize?’ is a perfect opener that encapsulates Dove’s introspective yet existential lyricism, as well as the band’s expanded sonic terrain. It’s written from the perspective of an old person who sees friends die off until only they remain. “We strive for old age but what’s even there if you make it?” asks Dove. Musically, it opens with gently lapping waves of electronics that sets the tone for a more electronically-leaning record.

A total electronic overhaul this is not, however. Instead, their third album sits in a sweet spot between evolutionary and revolutionary step; retaining the core essence and personality of the band but also moving into new territory. It embellishes and emboldens the band’s pre-existing palate, one that still nods to 1970s Germany on the careering ‘Clouds’ (a song that, antithetical to the opener, looks at life from the perspective of a child) and one that still exhibits their seamless knack for immersive melody via the gorgeous Yo La Tengo-like closer ‘Baby It’s Time.’

Amidst the engulfing soundscapes of ‘Juno Dreams’ is a sample of an old Texan psychic that cannot foresee a future for its subject, whilst the serene-to-nightmare psychedelic noise trip that is ‘Sacred Geometry’ is a direct exploration of the moment Dove was caught in the sandstorm. “The track is that nanosecond you have to make an important decision – the second part of it being the knock-on effect of making the wrong one.”

Playing with structure and form, and the overlapping role between lyrics and music, is rooted in the album. “I was tired of writing within the constraints of a verse/chorus structure and wanted to be expressive in alternative ways,” says Dove. “It’s like walking the same route to get from a to b – eventually it becomes mundane and for this record I wanted to try walking a different way.”

Dufficy also found himself going down a rabbit hole of old gear for the album, exploring four tracks, micro cassettes and drum machines. “I wanted to see how it would impact our writing and recording process,” he says. “By taking away the endless options you have in the digital world.” The result is one that adds to the already deeply textural world of the band – an approach that has previously reared its head via doo-wop-esque harmony vocals, thoughtfully layered immersive guitars or enveloping atmospheres – as well as adding a further sense of diving into the unknown.

The dodgy motors of the four-track led to drums and keys being all over the place on the track ‘Enveloping Cycles’, creating its own woozy, distinct rhythm of gently fizzing beats. That is before the machine gave up completely. “The four-track died right at the end of making the album, so its quirks will only ever exist on this album,” Dufficy says. “I like that, it’s kind of romantic to me.”

Psychic Markers debut ‘Baby, It’s Time’

Psychic Markers will release their self-titled, third full length album on 29 May via Bella Union. Today they share the a new track from the album, ‘Baby It’s Time.’

Speaking about the track, the band say: “This is the oldest of the tracks and was initially gonna go on Hardly Strangers but somehow it didn’t seem to fit and we’re album guys, structurally and conceptually it has to work in a holistic manner. We spruced it up a bit for this one. Alannah wrote the words and she explained how it represents the time for a change, ‘baby, it’s time to let go’, to me it had to be an album closer and a pretty beautiful one at that.”

A near death experience being sucked into an active sandstorm during a US road trip is enough to make you think about life. Being immersed in a swirling vortex of sand, dust, tumbleweed and detritus whilst trying to keep control of a speeding car might have only been a brief flash moment in Steven Dove’s life but it was enough for the Psychic Markers man to question life. “These things impact you,” he says. “I got thinking about human nature, our proneness to mistakes, imperfection and the implications of reactionary decision making.”

The results of such lyrical reflection, and broad spectrum of thought, can be heard throughout the latest Psychic Markers album, one that Dove describes as, “Imagine a David Cronenberg-style movie in which each morning you awake to find your brain merged inside someone else’s head – you see life from a totally different angle.”

Approaching things from a different angle was also the objective sonically. “We wanted to make an album that was 100% us,” says Leon Dufficy, who heads up the band with Dove. “With zero dilution from other influences.” This natural, intuition-led, direction is something immediately apparent on the album, one that weaves seamlessly between pulsing groove-locked electronica and psychedelic pop as frequently as it glides from sparkling melody to rich cinematic ambience.

“Cohesive yet diverse,” is what the band have said of their music and it fits their personalities too, with members coming from as far afield as Australia and Yorkshire. Dufficy and Dove wrote and produced the record together, the sultry yet subtle bass comes from Luke Jarvis, who also did the band’s artwork, whilst the glowing backing vocals of Alannah Ashworth feature alongside the shared percussion duties of Lewis Baker and Jim Wallis.

The opening track ‘Where Is the Prize?’ is a perfect opener that encapsulates Dove’s introspective yet existential lyricism, as well as the band’s expanded sonic terrain. It’s written from the perspective of an old person who sees friends die off until only they remain. “We strive for old age but what’s even there if you make it?” asks Dove. Musically, it opens with gently lapping waves of electronics that sets the tone for a more electronically-leaning record.

A total electronic overhaul this is not, however. Instead, their third album sits in a sweet spot between evolutionary and revolutionary step; retaining the core essence and personality of the band but also moving into new territory. It embellishes and emboldens the band’s pre-existing palate, one that still nods to 1970s Germany on the careering ‘Clouds’ (a song that, antithetical to the opener, looks at life from the perspective of a child) and one that still exhibits their seamless knack for immersive melody via the gorgeous Yo La Tengo-like closer ‘Baby It’s Time.’

Amidst the engulfing soundscapes of ‘Juno Dreams’ is a sample of an old Texan psychic that cannot foresee a future for its subject, whilst the serene-to-nightmare psychedelic noise trip that is ‘Sacred Geometry’ is a direct exploration of the moment Dove was caught in the sandstorm. “The track is that nanosecond you have to make an important decision – the second part of it being the knock-on effect of making the wrong one.”

Playing with structure and form, and the overlapping role between lyrics and music, is rooted in the album. “I was tired of writing within the constraints of a verse/chorus structure and wanted to be expressive in alternative ways,” says Dove. “It’s like walking the same route to get from a to b – eventually it becomes mundane and for this record I wanted to try walking a different way.”

Dufficy also found himself going down a rabbit hole of old gear for the album, exploring four tracks, micro cassettes and drum machines. “I wanted to see how it would impact our writing and recording process,” he says. “By taking away the endless options you have in the digital world.” The result is one that adds to the already deeply textural world of the band – an approach that has previously reared its head via doo-wop-esque harmony vocals, thoughtfully layered immersive guitars or enveloping atmospheres – as well as adding a further sense of diving into the unknown.

The dodgy motors of the four-track led to drums and keys being all over the place on the track ‘Enveloping Cycles’, creating its own woozy, distinct rhythm of gently fizzing beats. That is before the machine gave up completely. “The four-track died right at the end of making the album, so its quirks will only ever exist on this album,” Dufficy says. “I like that, it’s kind of romantic to me.”

Much like being caught in the middle of a sandstorm, or a piece of equipment holding out until the final sputtering moments of musical completion, there’s something unique, engulfing and encompassing about the latest Psychic Markers album. A beautiful bottling of time and place that magically ends up somewhere completely new.

 Psychic Markers’ self-titled, third LP is due for release 29 May via Bella Union.