Father John Misty Announces 2023 Tour

Father John Misty has announced news of additional UK and European live dates for February and March 2023. In late February Father John Misty has added shows in Oslo and Gothenburg while in March he’s added new UK shows in Brighton, Portsmouth and Leeds. Upcoming UK and European live info below…

Last week Father John Misty released Live At Electric Lady, a Spotify exclusive EP that features alternate versions of Chloë and The Next 20th Century highlights “Goodbye Mr. Blue,” “The Next 20th Century,” “Buddy’s Rendezvous,” “We Could Be Strangers,” “(Everything But) Her Love,” and a cover of Stevie Wonder’s “I Believe (When I Fall In Love It Will Be Forever).” The session was recorded in May 2022 at the famed Electric Lady studios in New York.

A.A. Williams Debuts “The Echo”

With her new album As The Moon Rests due out 7th October via Bella Union, and ahead of her London Queen Elizabeth Hall performance this Saturday, A.A. Williams today shares a powerful video for epic new single “The Echo”. Commenting on the track Williams says: “The Echo is a dialogue between a person’s heart and the head – the head trying to persuade the heart that what they need is to take time for themselves and prioritise their own well-being, not seek verification of one’s worth through their relationships with others. Originally titled Forever Blue, The Echo was begun in 2019 but wasn’t completed in time for inclusion on my debut album. Renamed and reworked, it is a song of yearning, sorrow and beauty.”

The compelling accompanying video directed by Fraser West depicts a young man’s dark odyssey around night-time London before reaching an unexpected ending.

“Traditionally, your second album is the worry; where there’s the weight of expectation,” A.A. Williams contends. “But I must create music I like myself, and I’ve had more time on this record; I’ve felt more confidence and conviction. As The Moon Rests is both heavier and softer, there’s more texture and weight, and a string ensemble. It’s Forever Blue times ten!”

Released in July 2020, Forever Blue was the London-based singer-songwriter’s album debut, a brilliantly dramatic, unique and intimate walk on the dark side that fused bold and smouldering hues of post-rock and post-classical. By turns, it was glacial and volcanic, blissful and violent, through moments of disarming quiet and explosive volume, equally appealing to alt-rock and metal camps.

“The shifts between moments of high drama and quiet tension point to her kinship with Chelsea Wolfe and PJ Harvey,” stated Uncut. “Stirring and evocative… The chances of a more heartrending and fully formed debut emerging this year are practically zero,” reckoned Metal Hammer.

As Williams contends, As The Moon Rests amplifies the scale of her ambitions, crystalised by ‘Evaporate’, the first track released from the sessions. It comes with a video that embodies the thrilling tensions of Williams’ world, where emotions walk a fine line between control and chaos. Likewise, the impact of William’s deep-trawling voice and lyrics that ask all the right existential questions throughout As The Moon Rests: who am I? What can I change? What can’t I change?

Forever Blue had already set in motion Williams’ quest for self-improvement, but the pandemic presented more challenges. As Forever Blue was about to be released, she started posting solo videos – cover versions suggested by her fans, such as Radiohead’s ‘Creep’, Nick Cave’s ‘Into Your Arms’ and Deftones’ ‘Be Quiet and Drive’, alchemised to fit her own crepuscular sound and vision. Songs From Isolation, as she called it, “was a positive experience to focus on through the overwhelming reports of bad news. And I could have a dialogue with my listeners.”

Songs From Isolation subsequently turned into a nine-track album of covers, a definite and heartaching document of solitude and fortitude. Next came arco, a re-imagining of Williams’ debut (self-titled) EP for just voice and strings. She’d played the string parts (as well as guitar and piano) on Forever Blue, but here she wrote the arrangements for a ten-piece ensemble, transposing the rhythm and low end of a rock band into sumptuous and elegant orchestrations.

The string ensemble returns for As The Moon Rests, bolstering the album’s cinematic dimensions and underlining the palpable drama of Williams’ quest to forge a more liberating path. The album’s opening track ‘Hollow Heart’ sets out the emotional terrain: “Give me time and I will learn / that I am only human,” she sings before the instruments begin their slow climb to boiling point. Williams’ voluminous guitar and keyboards are embellished by co-producer (and husband) Thomas Williams’ bass guitar, Geoff Holroyde’s drums and engineer / mixer Adrian Hall at his London studio Clever Pup (as opposed to the Williams’ two-bedroom flat for Forever Blue). “We had better equipment, and more experience at hand,” says Williams. When they were finished, As The Moon Rests clocked in at a mighty 62 minutes. “I was expecting to take a few recordings away after we’d finished, but the consensus was that everything was good, and worked as a collection.”

The album takes its title from the closing track. “For me, ‘As The Moon Rests’ jumped out as evoking a change in direction in the lyrics,” she explains. “It’s a love song, not necessarily romantic, but between two people with an unwavering bond. It seemed poignant and prominent enough to work as the title.”

That unwavering bond could equally exist between two conflicting parts of the self. “Most of Forever Blue’s text was quite insular,” she recalls. “I was trying to understand myself, trying to cure, or eradicate, parts of myself. But I realised that if you remove things; you might remove parts of your personality too. You just need to learn how to manage things, to be kinder to yourself. It’s all a journey, a progression.”

Williams would rather not specify any incidents, triggers or memories behind each individual song. “It’s all part of an overriding arc,” she says. “With hindsight, some songs I figure things out, others I disappear into a hole. For example, in ‘Evaporate’, I’m trying to keep a lid on fizzy complicated thoughts, which just explode. Other times, I’m more relaxed. Mostly, writing is more retrospective, not about the here and now. The lyrics are the place where I figure things out.”

Now Williams and her live band – Thomas Williams, Wayne Proctor and multi-instrumentalist Matthew de Burgh Daly – get to figure out a proper headline tour in support of an album, since lockdown meant that their first headline show on London’s South Bank in early 2020 became her last for well over a year, until a short headline tour in Autumn 2021 that at least gave them the chance to commune with fans and feel the white heat and spark of performance. In August of this year, they’re supporting Japanese post-rockers MONO, Williams’ collaborators for the 10” vinyl single ‘Exit in Darkness’; in September, to launch As the Moon Rests, comes their biggest headline show yet at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. Following that, Williams will undertake her first comprehensive headline tour: a 6-week trek across the UK and Europe, taking in 34 shows over 12 countries. Williams’ journey may have been held up by events, but in all other aspects, everything that culminates in As The Moon Rests is incontrovertible proof that it continues to build and thrive.

Jambinai Announce Apparition EP

JAMBINAI today announce the release of Apparition, a new 4-track EP, out 11th November via Bella Union and available to preorder here. To celebrate the announcement the band have shared an intense live performance video for “Once More From That Frozen Bottom”, the EP’s incendiary opening track, filmed last winter at the ARTE museum in Yeosu. Additionally, JAMBINAI have been announced as one of the headline acts at the Portals Festival at EartH in Hackney on 27th May 2023.

For JAMBINAI, South Korea’s maestros of intense folk-infused post-rock, it has been the best of times and the worst of times since the release of their third album ONDA in 2019. 

In February 2020, the quintet won Best Rock Album for ONDA and Best Rock Song for the title track at South Korea’s Music Awards, but then came the pandemic. The quintet’s brilliant new four-track EP Apparition captures the depth and range of emotions that JAMBINAI have felt these last few years, from anxious lockdowns and thwarted plans to the thrill of renewed creativity, hunger and hope. 

As co-founder and band spokesman Lee Il-woo recalls, “After ONDA we saw 2020 as a new opportunity to work on a bigger stage. I personally wanted to release a new album and tour to exhaust the energy of ONDAand find new inspiration, but it didn’t work out that way. We didn’t find enough energy to make a full album yet, so for now we are releasing four songs.”

The title Apparition stems from Lee’s perception of the band he has steered since 2011. “JAMBINAI have been making intense music for an intense group of devotees in invisible places,” he says. “Overall, I have tried to express a message of comfort to everyone living in a difficult time due to the pandemic and what’s going on in the world.”

Lee’s projection of comfort starkly contrasts with the energy force that carries it: a unique combination of primary rock colour (electric guitar, bass, drums) and Korean folk instruments: the piri (bamboo oboe), the yanggeum (hammered dulcimer), geomungo (zither) and saenghwang (reed mouth organ). 

Apparition’s four song titles alone nail the otherworldly sensations that define the JAMBINAI experience. Lead track ‘Once More From That Frozen Bottom’ instantly conjures up a landscape that feels volcanic as well as icy. At other times, JAMBINAI  employ the slow burn, establishing a mood of serenity before the volume blasts upward and the atmosphere turns supremely dark, such as ‘Until My Wings Turn To Ashes’ and a live version of ‘Candlelight In Colossal Darkness’ which closes the EP with a sense of reflection and acceptance.

That leaves ‘From The Place Been Erased’, featuring the guest vocals of K Pop legend swja (also known as sunwoojunga, well known for working with 2NE1, Black Pink, and BTS). “I thought swja’s voice would go well with our music,” says Lee, “so I asked her for help. I am honoured that she willingly participated. Despite our heavy and strong sound, she understood its inner emotions.”

Apparition proves that JAMBINAI are not just alive and kicking, but more energised than ever, making up for lost time and momentum. Playing the 2018 Winter Olympic Games closing ceremony in their home city of Seoul had set up the forward momentum that produced ONDA. The South Korean awards similarly upped the ante for the follow-up. Though JAMBINAI also won the Asia category at global music bible Songlines’ annual awards at the end of 2020, only the thrill and thrust of new music and performance would truly count. First, money reserved for airfares for a cancelled tour in 2020 was used to film online performances for the digital TV channel Audiotree. Then in the spring of 2021, JAMBINAI played at the ‘virtual’ SXSW festival, from which the performance video for the aptly named ‘Time Of Extinction’ was taken, followed by a show for the Tiny Desk (home) Concert series. 

By the end of 2021, JAMBINAI were finally recording what became Apparition, but they didn’t stop there. Through April 2022, the band released four acoustic performances. There was even a collaboration with Soojung Baek’s boutique Craft Codes, combining two of her scents, “that seemed to match our music the best,” says Lee.

The urge to create has only driven JAMBINA’s members further on. In September, Lee will be working as a concert master of the traditional Gyeonggi Sinawi Orchestra for performances in Poland, Hungary, Austria, Slovenia and the Czech Republic then collaborating with hardcore rock trio PAKK at London’s annual K-Music Festival in October. He also wrote the music for the first series of the BBC’s Korean-set crime podcast “The Lazarus Heist”. 

JAMBINAI other two co-founders have been busy too. Kim Bomi and Sim Eunyong co-wrote the music for a modern art piece in South Korea’s National Museum of Contemporary and Modern Arts; having released a solo album at the end of 2019, Sim wrote and performed the music for a piece by choreographer Jinyeob Cha in June 2022. Kim also currently DJs for a Korean traditional music radio broadcast.

The three members, with JAMBINAI drummer Jaehyuk Choi and bassist B.K Yu, will join forces for a tour starting in May 2023, and “when there’s an empty space, I want to make a new album,” Lee confirms. Not being able to celebrate the band’s tenth anniversary in 2021, “was a very disappointing moment,” he says. “But it’s okay. We will release more albums and become a better band until the 20th anniversary show.”

Apparition tracklist below…

1. Once More From That Frozen Bottom

2. From The Place Been Erased (featuring swja)

3. Until My Wings Turn To Ashes

4. Candlelight In Colossal Darkness

Happy Release Day To Ezra Furman

Ezra Furman today releases her new record, All Of Us Flames via Bella Union and Anti Records. Inside the world of All of Us Flames, the end of the patriarchal capitalist empire seems both imminent and inevitable, a turn down a path we can’t see yet but can’t avoid, either. Produced by John Congleton, All of Us Flames unleashes Furman’s songwriting in an open, vivid sound whose boldness heightens the music’s urgency. 

A singer, songwriter, and author whose incendiary music has soundtracked the Netflix show Sex Education, Furman has for years woven together stories of queer discontent and unlikely, fragile intimacies. She has a knack for zeroing in on the light that sparks when struggling people find each other and ease each other’s course. All of Us Flames widens that focus to a communal scope, painting transformative connections among people who unsettle the stories power tells to sustain itself. 

“Ezra Furman is on a roll… All Of Us Flames sparkles… Her observations are succinct, original and fearless.” 
Mail On Sunday

“All Of Us Flames reveals a more humble and equanimous Furman, an empathetic artist still committed to truth-telling, still railing against the injustices of the world.” 
The Line of Best Fit
 
“Her most ambitious collection of pop brilliance.” 
Loud & Quiet

All Of Us Flames roars with emotional truth and transformative power… A revitalised rock’n’roll soundtrack for a push towards the brightening of the light.” 
Uncut

“Bold, profoundly honest, and deeply insightful, this is an inspired return, one that might rank as her finest.” 
Clash

“One of the best, most important albums of the year… All Of Us Flames has the potential to go down in history”
Gigwise

“Diverse, tuneful and vibrant, it’s often euphoric.” 
Record Collector

A.A. Williams Shares “Golden”

With her new album As The Moon Rests due out 7th October via Bella Union, and having previously shared a video for lead track ‘Evaporate’, today A.A. Williams unveils new single “Golden”. Commenting on the track Williams says: “It is sometimes possible to find ourselves in a situation unable to be objective, unable to see one’s part in the greater picture. Sometimes we are even the root of a problem we didn’t even realise was occurring. Golden speaks of the push and pull between enjoying being in a loving situation, yet simultaneously, unwittingly, ruining it.”

“Traditionally, your second album is the worry; where there’s the weight of expectation,” A.A. Williams contends. “But I must create music I like myself, and I’ve had more time on this record; I’ve felt more confidence and conviction. As The Moon Rests is both heavier and softer, there’s more texture and weight, and a string ensemble. It’s Forever Blue times ten!”

Released in July 2020, Forever Blue was the London-based singer-songwriter’s album debut, a brilliantly dramatic, unique and intimate walk on the dark side that fused bold and smouldering hues of post-rock and post-classical. By turns, it was glacial and volcanic, blissful and violent, through moments of disarming quiet and explosive volume, equally appealing to alt-rock and metal camps.

“The shifts between moments of high drama and quiet tension point to her kinship with Chelsea Wolfe and PJ Harvey,” stated Uncut. “Stirring and evocative… The chances of a more heartrending and fully formed debut emerging this year are practically zero,” reckoned Metal Hammer.

As Williams contends, As The Moon Rests amplifies the scale of her ambitions, crystalised by ‘Evaporate’, the first track released from the sessions. It comes with a video that embodies the thrilling tensions of Williams’ world, where emotions walk a fine line between control and chaos. Likewise, the impact of William’s deep-trawling voice and lyrics that ask all the right existential questions throughout As The Moon Rests: who am I? What can I change? What can’t I change?

Forever Blue had already set in motion Williams’ quest for self-improvement, but the pandemic presented more challenges. As Forever Blue was about to be released, she started posting solo videos – cover versions suggested by her fans, such as Radiohead’s ‘Creep’, Nick Cave’s ‘Into Your Arms’ and Deftones’ ‘Be Quiet and Drive’, alchemised to fit her own crepuscular sound and vision. Songs From Isolation, as she called it, “was a positive experience to focus on through the overwhelming reports of bad news. And I could have a dialogue with my listeners.”

Songs From Isolation subsequently turned into a nine-track album of covers, a definite and heartaching document of solitude and fortitude. Next came arco, a re-imagining of Williams’ debut (self-titled) EP for just voice and strings. She’d played the string parts (as well as guitar and piano) on Forever Blue, but here she wrote the arrangements for a ten-piece ensemble, transposing the rhythm and low end of a rock band into sumptuous and elegant orchestrations.

Forever Blue had already set in motion Williams’ quest for self-improvement, but the pandemic presented more challenges. As Forever Blue was about to be released, she started posting solo videos – cover versions suggested by her fans, such as Radiohead’s ‘Creep’, Nick Cave’s ‘Into Your Arms’ and Deftones’ ‘Be Quiet and Drive’, alchemised to fit her own crepuscular sound and vision. Songs From Isolation, as she called it, “was a positive experience to focus on through the overwhelming reports of bad news. And I could have a dialogue with my listeners.”

Songs From Isolation subsequently turned into a nine-track album of covers, a definite and heartaching document of solitude and fortitude. Next came arco, a re-imagining of Williams’ debut (self-titled) EP for just voice and strings. She’d played the string parts (as well as guitar and piano) on Forever Blue, but here she wrote the arrangements for a ten-piece ensemble, transposing the rhythm and low end of a rock band into sumptuous and elegant orchestrations.

The string ensemble returns for As The Moon Rests, bolstering the album’s cinematic dimensions and underlining the palpable drama of Williams’ quest to forge a more liberating path. The album’s opening track ‘Hollow Heart’ sets out the emotional terrain: “Give me time and I will learn / that I am only human,” she sings before the instruments begin their slow climb to boiling point. Williams’ voluminous guitar and keyboards are embellished by co-producer (and husband) Thomas Williams’ bass guitar, Geoff Holroyde’s drums and engineer / mixer Adrian Hall at his London studio Clever Pup (as opposed to the Williams’ two-bedroom flat for Forever Blue). “We had better equipment, and more experience at hand,” says Williams. When they were finished, As The Moon Rests clocked in at a mighty 62 minutes. “I was expecting to take a few recordings away after we’d finished, but the consensus was that everything was good, and worked as a collection.”

The album takes its title from the closing track. “For me, ‘As The Moon Rests’ jumped out as evoking a change in direction in the lyrics,” she explains. “It’s a love song, not necessarily romantic, but between two people with an unwavering bond. It seemed poignant and prominent enough to work as the title.”

That unwavering bond could equally exist between two conflicting parts of the self. “Most of Forever Blue’s text was quite insular,” she recalls. “I was trying to understand myself, trying to cure, or eradicate, parts of myself. But I realised that if you remove things; you might remove parts of your personality too. You just need to learn how to manage things, to be kinder to yourself. It’s all a journey, a progression.”

Williams would rather not specify any incidents, triggers or memories behind each individual song. “It’s all part of an overriding arc,” she says. “With hindsight, some songs I figure things out, others I disappear into a hole. For example, in ‘Evaporate’, I’m trying to keep a lid on fizzy complicated thoughts, which just explode. Other times, I’m more relaxed. Mostly, writing is more retrospective, not about the here and now. The lyrics are the place where I figure things out.”

Now Williams and her live band – Thomas Williams, Wayne Proctor and multi-instrumentalist Matthew de Burgh Daly – get to figure out a proper headline tour in support of an album, since lockdown meant that their first headline show on London’s South Bank in early 2020 became her last for well over a year, until a short headline tour in Autumn 2021 that at least gave them the chance to commune with fans and feel the white heat and spark of performance. In August of this year, they’re supporting Japanese post-rockers MONO, Williams’ collaborators for the 10” vinyl single ‘Exit in Darkness’; in September, to launch As the Moon Rests, comes their biggest headline show yet at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. Following that, Williams will undertake her first comprehensive headline tour: a 6-week trek across the UK and Europe, taking in 34 shows over 12 countries. Williams’ journey may have been held up by events, but in all other aspects, everything that culminates in As The Moon Rests is incontrovertible proof that it continues to build and thrive.

Thursday 18th August – Bristol – Arctangent Festival

Sunday 21st August – Oslo – Kulturkirken Jakob

Monday 22nd August – Stockholm – Sodra Teatern

Tuesday 23rd August – Copenhagen – Pumpehuset

Wednesday 24th August – Hamburg – Uebel & Gefahrlich

Thursday 25th August – Berlin – Hole44

Friday 26th August – Koln – Luxor

Sunday 28th August – Antwerp – Kavka Zappa

Wednesday 31st August – Zurich – Mascotte

Thursday 1st September – Paris – Le Trabendo

Saturday 3rd September – Barcelona – Apolo 2

Sunday 4th September – Murcia – Garage Beat Club

Monday 5th September – Seville – Sala Custom

Tuesday 6th September – Porto – Hard Club

Wednesday 7th September – Lisbon – RCA Club

Thursday 8th September – Madrid – Mon Madrid

Friday 9th September – Biarritz – Atabal

Sunday 11th September – Bensancon – L’antonnoir

Monday 12th September – Lille – Aeronef

Saturday 19th November – Dunkerque – Les 4Ecluses

Saturday 17th September – London – Queen Elizabeth Hall

Sunday 13th November – Leeds – Brudenell Social Club

Monday 14th November – Milton Keynes – Craufurd Arms

Tuesday 15th November – Birmingham – Hare & Hounds

Wednesday 16th November – Cardiff – Clwb Ifor Bach

Thursday 17th November – Falmouth – The Cornish Bank

Friday 18th November – Bristol – Thekla

Saturday 19th November – Dunkerque – Les 4 Ecluses

Sunday 20th November – Savigny -le-temple – L’Empreinte

Tuesday 22nd November – Nantes – Le Ferrailleur

Wednesday 23rd November – Rouen – Le 106

Thursday 24th November – Lyon – Hard Rock Café

Friday 25th November – Metz – L’Aerogare Station Lothaire

Saturday 26th November – Strasbourg – Artefact La Laiterie

Sunday 27th November – Duffel – Cinema Plaza

Monday 28th November – Tilburg – Cultuurfabriek Hall Of Fame

Wednesday 30th November – Hamburg – Hafenklang

Thursday 1st December – Copenhagen – Vega

Friday 2nd December – Aalborg – 1000Fryd

Sunday 4th December – Bergen – Landmark

Monday 5th December – Oslo – Bla

Tuesday 6th December – Stockholm – Hus 7

Thursday 8th December – Helsinki – Kuudes Linja

Saturday 10th December – Gdansk – Drizzly Grizzly

Sunday 11th December – Warsaw – Klub Hydrozagadka

Monday 12th December – Krakow – Hol

Tuesday 13th December – Wroclaw – Akademia Club

Wednesday 14th December – Berlin – Urban Spree

Friday 16th December – Milan – Bloom

Saturday 17th December – Lucernce – Sedel

Sunday 18th December – Karlsruhe – Stadmitte

Monday 19th December – Frankfurt – Brotfabrik

Tuesday 20th December – Cologne – Buhmann & Sohn

Wednesday 21st December – Haarlem – Patronaat

Listen To Ezra Furman’s “Poor Girl A Long Way From Heaven”

Ezra Furman today releases a new single/video, “Poor Girl A Long Way From Heaven”, from her forthcoming record All Of Us Flames, out 26th August via Bella Union. On “Poor Girl A Long Way From Heaven”, Furman recounts a childhood encounter with God, a gesture of spiritual yearning that flows into the album’s biblical facets. “The spiritual life ain’t all pious platitudes,” she elaborates. “This song is about how weird it gets, when you’re in love with the Source of Being and She’s not texting you back. Ever since it hit me that I was never going to be loved and accepted on the scale of my pop star heroes, me and my bandmates have started to work on a different vision of pop, one more our own, one that gestures at the stranger truths of the human mind. Here we are in thrall to verbally adventurous nineties music like Bjork and Beck and the Silver Jews and them kinda non-linear geniuses.”

As for the video, directed by Haoyan of America, Furman “basically told Haoyan a story I made up about a trans Joan of Arc narrowly avoiding her public execution, and then gave him free reign to do whatever he wanted with it, as long as Daphne Always (also seen in our recent ‘Forever in Sunset’ video) played Joan. I adore the cracked brilliance of what came out.”

Early acclaim for All Of Us Flames:

All Of Us Flames roars with emotional truth and transformative power… A revitalised rock’n’roll soundtrack for a push towards the brightening of the light.” Uncut – 8/10

“Bold, profoundly honest, and deeply insightful, this is an inspired return, one that might rank as her finest, most complete record to date.” Clash – 9/10

“If All Of Us Flames feels more hopeful, rest assured there is no downscaling of tension or combat. Inspired by the network within queer communities, Furman taps the Springsteen DNA in her helix of influences.” MOJO – 4 stars ****

“Diverse, tuneful and vibrant, it’ often euphoric: ‘Dressed in Black’, with its Spector-ish Wall of Sound, and ‘Forever in Sunset’, a Bruce Springsteen-style anthem reimagined for a 21st century queer community, are defiant in the face of oppression.” Record Collector – 4 stars ****

A singer, songwriter, and author whose incendiary music has soundtracked the Netflix show SexEducation, Furman has for years woven together stories of queer discontent and unlikely, fragile intimacies. All of Us Flames is “a queer album for the stage of life when you start to understand that you are not a lone wolf, but depend on finding your family, your people, how you work as part of a larger whole. I wanted to make songs for use by threatened communities, and particularly the ones I belong to: trans people and Jews.

All of Us Flames is the third instalment in a trilogy of albums, beginning with 2018’s Springsteen-inflected road saga Transangelic Exodus and continuing with the punk rock fury of 2019’s Twelve Nudes. Writing much of Flames during the early months of the pandemic, Furman drove to seek solitude, parked in arbitrary quiet spots around Massachusetts, and began to write. The songs that came flowed toward ideas of communality and networks of care, systems of survival cultivated by necessity among people who have been historically deprived of them. With Furman’s widened focus, All of Us Flames paints transformative connections among people who unsettle the stories power tells to sustain itself.