Liela Moss Debuts “Come and Find Me”

Next week sees the release of Internal Working Model, the much-anticipated new album from Liela Moss, via Bella Union. Ahead of the release Liela today shares her new single, “Come And Find Me”, from the LP. Commenting on the track Liela says: “The idea running throughout this track is that co-operation is natural, and competition is a construct. “Iʼm trying to be the bigger man, always seeing” … Using empathy as the guide, we could neutralise the bad guys. My favourite lines are these: ‘This should be embodied dream space, should be free space, should be fair. That’s all’. I mean, that is all, right?! It’s such a rhythmic track, and the synth arpeggios layer up in a way that adds electricity and force to the ideas in the song; resistance against obstacles to fairness.

Early acclaim for Internal Working Model:

“A passionate plea for empathy and reconnection… Striking sonics match her for zeal and daring, gargantuan, sometimes retro-futurist grooves vying with layered vocals and dark soundscapes…

A record of rare ambition and thematic complexity.” MOJO – 4 stars ****

“Moss rages at the world’s iniquities over retro-synth grooves on ‘Vanishing Shadows’ with Gary Numan on guest vocals, and sketches an empathetic prescription for our ills on the hauntingly tender ‘New Day’.

She’s angry, but she’s trying to offer some answers too: more power to her for such positivity.” Uncut – 7/10

“An impassioned career high from a committed, commanding voice.” Record Collector – 4 stars ****

“Vanishing Shadows finds her silver vocals decisively leading the way over fractious synth backdrops, while more mellow melters like New Day are fuelled by the force of her questioning insights.

This is Moss at her most switched-on.” DJ Magazine

Liela has also announced news of two upcoming live dates in the week of release, performing at the Prince Albert in Brighton and at Rough Trade East in London. Dates / info below:

Tuesday 17th January – Brighton – Prince Albert

Wednesday 18th January – London – Rough Trade East in-store

“I’m trying to find a way to plug myself into a new community,” says Liela Moss of her third solo album. “I am imagining a tribe, navigating away from our very centralised culture, dismantling it and revising the way I think things work.”

After the haunting My Name Is Safe in Your Mouth (2018) and the dramatic, synth-loaded Who the Power (2020), Internal Working Model bristles with frustration at our disconnected culture but also – crucially – burns with a desire to reconnect: “We see the beneficiaries of the status quo suppress realness and wellbeing by selling you a banal alternative that upholds their agenda. I want to add to the firepower to burn that old house down.”

A sense of controlled urgency emerges, fuelled by the force of Moss’ questioning insights. In part, it’s an album about selfhood and certainties unsettled in today’s dystopian theatre, somewhat by the pandemic but also, says Moss, by the “self-seeking, self-protecting culture” of global economics where we have forgotten that “competition is just a construct, co-operation is actually the natural way of being… Lyrically, I’m laughing and yelling at surveillance capitalism, I’m throwing down sentences that reach out to simply feel good on good terrain, to feel safe on planet earth. There is turbulence, but an understanding that the urge to restructure is growing; human goodness cannot truly be suppressed.”

With Moss’ expressive voice leading the way over fractious synth backdrops, the result is at once tense and tender, timeless and timely; determined to plug into positivity wherever it can be found. “It’s like a carnival of good will,” says Moss, “we see the pretence, the masquerade. Then the realness, the love. That’s why the word ‘empathy’ comes up so much and rolls around amongst the most menacing synths. It cannot be kept down, no matter the weight.”

As Liela explains of the album’s relationship to Who the Power, “I wanted a more vigorous pulse, I wanted more movement. I wanted to feel friction and for things to feel emotionally disruptive this time around.” Also at its core sits Moss’ interest in attachment theory, the idea that the ways we are cared for (or not) in childhood forge the neurological pathways that build esteem, that shape us – and perhaps the world. “I started to think about the nefarious characters in globalist culture who have such a hold on what’s going on in terms of big pharma, big tech and big political everything. I was thinking, my God, these manipulative people started life needing to be attended to properly and probably were not! All this desperate greed and corruption winds back to maladapted individuals! Then I began seeing them as tiny, neglected humans with an unhealthy attachment cycle.”

Internal Working Model’s creation evolved organically between Moss and partner/collaborator Toby Butler, who divided their time between work and parenting to make the album. Moss compares the process to a “slow game of cards,” the duo revealing their hands in a playful spirit. The “third brain in the room,” says Moss, was the modular synth: “You tweak it and it changes the energy. There’s nothing new in that technology, but in terms of the way we’ve worked for years, working with an anonymous synth brain was a new kind of freedom.”

In earlier years, Moss’ environs have included The Duke Spirit, the guitar band whose output ranged from brawling alt-rock to more cinematic ventures. Other outlets have included synth-rock project (with Butler) Roman Remains and various collaborative ventures – with UNKLE, Nick Cave, Giorgio Moroder, The Heritage Orchestra and Lost Horizons, among others. She also served as muse for fashion icons Alexander McQueen and Phillip Lim. That combination of self-possession, exploration and receptivity drives Internal Working Model. Personal and expansive, galvanic and inquisitive, it’s an album that sees the modern world’s mess through open eyes but isn’t willing to stop there: it wants to seek out solutions, source the potential in other ways of being and seeing.